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Japan's Pacifist Constitution Explained

Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Studies in Asian Security by Paul Midford. Midford argues that Japanese public opinion has never embraced pacifism.

Levkowitz on Midford, 'Rethinking Japanese Public Opinion and Security: From Pacifism to Realism?'

It has, instead, contained significant elements of realism, in that it has acknowledged the utility of military power for defending national territory and independence, but has seen offensive military power as ineffective for promoting other goalssuch as suppressing terrorist networks and WMD proliferation, or promoting democracy overseas. Over several decades, these realist attitudes have become more evident as the Japanese state has gradually convinced its public that Tokyo and its military can be trusted with territorial defense, and even with noncombat humanitarian and reconstruction missions overseas.

On this basis, says Midford, we should re-conceptualize Japanese public opinion as attitudinal defensive realism. Get A Copy. Kindle Edition , pages.

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Published January 24th by Stanford University Press. More Details Other Editions 1. Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Rethinking Japanese Public Opinion and Security: From Pacifism to Realism?

To ask other readers questions about Rethinking Japanese Public Opinion and Security , please sign up. Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Community Reviews. Showing Second, I found that, although it is common for academic works on Japanese foreign policy to cite a poll result or two here and there, there was exceptionally little scholarly research, even in Japanese and especially in English, on Japanese public opinion and its influence on security policy.

Fortuitously, several months after the meeting I received an invitation from friend and colleague Robert Eldridge to join a project he was organizing on Japanese public opinion and the war on terrorism. Robert and I eventually published the results of this project in our coedited volume with Palgrave Macmillan in Japanese Public Opinion and the War on Terrorism.

Rethinking Japanese Public Opinion and Security: From Pacifism to Realism? | Foreign Affairs

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No cover image. Read preview. Midford argues that Japanese public opinion has never embraced pacifism. It has, instead, contained significant elements of realism, in that it has acknowledged the utility of military power for defending national territory and independence, but has seen offensive military power as ineffective for promoting other goals- such as suppressing terrorist networks and WMD proliferation, or promoting democracy overseas.